[Strategic information for decision-making] SENAMHI updates Peru’s climate map after 33 years

Thirty-eight climate types are distributed across the national territory, according to the Climate Classification Map of Peru, which has been updated after 33 years, based on information from 504 weather stations of the SENAMHI network. This is thanks to joint work between the Ministry of Environment (MINAM) with the Peruvian Service of Meteorology and Hydrology (SENAMHI), which is attached to the ministry.

©Peruvian Service of Meteorology and Hydrology (SENAMHI)

The “Climates of Peru” webinar was organised by the Peruvian Meteorological and Hydrological Service on Friday 22 January 2021.  It was supported by the Climate Change Management Support Project, and was part of the Dialogue on the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), led by the Peruvian Ministry of Environment.

The NDCs Dialogue is a multi-sector, multi-level and multi-actor participatory process for implementing and publishing NDC measures in the Integrated Climate Change Management, through constant interaction to facilitate alliances and agreements between different agencies.

Gabriel Quijandría, Minister of Environment, said that Peru’s climate had always played a decisive role. “This Climate Map of Peru will be a valuable management tool for planning and decision-making at all levels”

He stressed that the updated climate map will provide more information about the climates of each region. “We need this to be a living document that will help us to make decisions, one that is used in all government sectors” he said.

Gabriel Quijandría, Minister of Environment, Peru                        

He also pointed out that Peruvian society has developed around this fact of nature and plays a key role in the knowledge about its characteristics and dynamics. “The greatest climate variety is found in those regions that combine the Andean and Amazon environments. Puno alone has almost half of all the climates in the country,” he added.

The Executive President of SENAMHI, Ken Takahashi, said that the climate is constantly changing and that the study would allow us to observe the various scenarios and manage the country better. “The information will allow us to discover new and better ways of planning Peru’s territory,” he added.  

Ken Takahashi, Executive President of the Peruvian Meteorological and Hydrological Service

Martin Jaggi, Head of SDC, said “the Climate Classification Map of Peru is a very thorough meteorological work. This update, after 33 years, is important for a country as diverse as Peru, and will help decision-making within the country.”

He added: “As an international cooperation agency, SDC is happy to see Colombia and Argentina at this webinar, showing their climate maps as part of South-South cooperation discussions.”

Martin Jaggi, Head of SDC in Peru and the Andean region, at the Swiss Embassy in Lima

Climate Classification Map of Peru

The map has been updated after 33 years, through thorough research with better methodology. Looking at Peru’s complex topography, it is clear that 46.4 per cent of the national territory exhibits a very rainy and warm climate; and the most extensive climates are arid and temperate on the coast, rainy and cold in the highlands, and very rainy and warm in the jungle. 

Peru has 38 climates
©Peruvian Service of Meteorology and Hydrology (SENAMHI)

Info graphic
Climate Classification Map of Peru

©Peruvian Service of Meteorology and Hydrology (SENAMHI)

The current version contains a range of 38 climates (11 more than in 1988) distributed nationally and by Department, according to the characteristics of temperature, precipitation and evapo-transpiration, which provides a better understanding of the climates of each region.

The study will enable Peru to provide scientific information on climatology, in order to strengthen the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) in thematic areas including water, agriculture, fisheries and aquaculture, forestry and health.

The Climate Classification Map is the result of collaboration with representatives of sub-national government, public and private agencies and academia.

The Climate Classification Map update was promoted by MINAM and SENAMHI, had the technical and financial support of SDC’s Climate Change Management Support Project (Phase 2), which aims to improve climate information for decision-making, working closely with the Peruvian Meteorology and Hydrology Service through capacity-building, conducting climate change studies, and producing climate information and services in the face of climate change effects. The NGO Libélula and South South North are the project’s executive agencies.

The Climate Change Management Support Project is an initiative of the Global Climate Change and Environment Programme of the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC).

See the webinar in the following videos:

  • The experience of Colombia and Argentina. IDEAM Colombia and the Argentinean Meteorological Service
  • Presentation of the Climate Classification Map of Peru – Grinia Ávalos, Deputy Director, Climate Prediction Division (SENAMHI)
  • Expert Round Table: Dr. Ken Takahashi, Executive President of SENAMHI; Eng. Edwin Mancilla Ucañani, Technical Secretary of the Regional Council of Climate Change of the Cusco Region; Julio Alegría Galarreta (Engineer), Representative of Asociación Especializada para el Desarrollo Sostenible  (AEDES), Arequipa; Dr. Carmen Felipe-Morales Basurto, Professor at the Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina (Lima); Hugo Pantoja Tapia (Engineer), Director of the Zone Department 2 of SENAMHI Lambayeque; Pablo Eloy Puertas Meléndez, Executive President of the Peruvian Amazon Research Institute (IIAP).

Links of interest
Website: Climate Change Management Support Project
Fact sheet Climate Change Management Support Project

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